Galleries/Gallery Beat
Hitting History Hard

Hitting History Hard

Frohawk Two Feathers brings revolution to art and politics  Frohawk Two Feathers is re-writing American history.  In his current exhibition at Morgan Lehman Gallery, “Heartbreaking and Shit, But That’s the Globe. The Battle of Manhattan,” he has re-imagined the conquest of North America from a very different point of view than what you were taught...
Back to the Beatles’ Future

Back to the Beatles’ Future

Julian Lennon’s exhibit of early Beatles photos gets real There has been a lot of hoopla regarding the Beatles’ 50th anniversary of coming to America and appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show. The Grammy madness could be a bit much. Don’t get me wrong; this was an important event. Paul & Ringo were great and it...
Lively Still Lifes

Lively Still Lifes

Danielle M. Marin’s various techniques combine at Noho Gallery in Chelsea At NOHO gallery, Daniele M. Marin is showing her new series of still-lifes entitled “Interaction”.  Marin examines her association with this medium and explores various eras of art history. Indeed, there appears to be references to James Ensor, traditional still life and along with...
Re-launching the Ready-mades

Re-launching the Ready-mades

L’Objet Trouve in Chelsea and Spiegelman uptown   2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the debut of Marcel Duchamp’s art-world shaking piece Bicycle Wheel. By mounting a bicycle wheel on an old wooden stool and declaring it “art,” Duchamp effectively set the 20th Century art world in motion.  To celebrate the act that launched a million artists,...
Everlasting Album Art

Everlasting Album Art

Browsing Don Hunstein’s timeless pop star photography     You got older but they didn’t. See them as they were—Bob Dylan, Miles Davis, Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel, Aretha Franklin, and dozens more–in their best preserved envelope of time.  Photographs by Don Hunstein, the great “in-house photographer” for Columbia Records, are in a show encompassing 30 years,...
Storefront Visions

Storefront Visions

Baumann paints the same city, different times   There is a lovely small show of paintings on West 14th Street that evokes a sweet nostalgia for New York City of another era. But blink and you might miss it! The 14th Street Framing Gallery is the kind of local business that used to help define the...
Only Engage

Only Engage

Soto-Diaz and Bisbing shows stay connected and personal    These days we’re nothing if not connected. And so is our art; one of the most salient features of contemporary art is the drive for inclusiveness—for the dismantling of the last barriers between art object and viewer, using new technologies, novel mixtures of media, and site-specific installations....
Crying Time

Crying Time

 John Kirby makes art out of tears  Some artists paint from the eye in the classic phrase. John Kirby’s work derives from the lacrimal gland as much as the imagination. His sad portraits of people who seem already defeated in their internalized desire to connect can make a visitor weep as well as applaud. His paintings...
Ken Price in Reverse

Ken Price in Reverse

The art of communication at the Met  The crowd around me breathed a sigh of relief as we walked into the last room of the Metropolitan Museum’s Ken Price retrospective. “Oh, I like these!” said one woman, hurrying closer to a case of little ceramic cups. The whole room was full of small, shiny objects...
Making Art Socialable

Making Art Socialable

ArtistEngage connects artists to the world   Here’s an evergreen question: how does an emerging artist get his or her work out there? These days, the answer seems to lie in navigating an ever-proliferating, often-overwhelming array of apps and social media possibilities. Somewhere between figuring it out on your own and overly formal “how to” conference...
Rediscovering Carnival

Rediscovering Carnival

Fête Paradiso comes to New York  Touring the acre or so of Governor’s Island dedicated to Fête Paradiso is like traveling back in time to a simpler past, to the sunlit French countryside on a summer’s Sunday in the early 19th century, where villagers have gathered to eat, drink, and enjoy handcrafted carnival rides and...
York’s Ville

York’s Ville

Albert York captures nature’s crooked perfection  In 1995, the New Yorker art critic Calvin Tomkins asked Albert York why he painted. Stubbing out a cigarette, York replied, “I think we live in a paradise. This is a Garden of Eden, really it is. It might be the only paradise we ever know, and it’s just...
Art of the Mind

Art of the Mind

[UN]SEEN finds art in Hell’s Kitchen     As the steamroller of development moves, seemingly unstoppable, through Manhattan, we see the loss of many things that lured us to the city in the first place. Amongst the first to fall have been music, performance and art spaces that once nurtured the young, the experimental and the under-represented...
Conversations with Ego

Conversations with Ego

Milan Heger takes on celebrity Ego sometimes gets a bad rap. Sure, no one wants to be called an egotist, and I know plenty of people with that condition, but there is another side of the ego that causes us to strive for perfection via competition. Milan Heger’s mixed media pieces (showing in BBLA Gallery...
Don’t Blink

Don’t Blink

On “Blinkey” Palermo’s vehicles for color Palermo, born Peter Schwarze in Leipzig in 1943, was 34 when he died in 1977. He and his twin brother Michael were adopted by a couple named Heisterkamp and escaped to Munich in 1952. In 1962 he enrolled in the Kunstacadamie Dusseldorf, studied with Joseph Beuys and acquired the...
Extracting the Real

Extracting the Real

Evelyn Twitchell’s absorbing abstractions at Bowery Gallery  Painting can be a sign, a concept, or documentation. In the postmodern age, it can be a comment about painting itself. Of course, it can even be a likeness – and this may be the most challenging of all because of the sheer complexity of the language of...
Suspending Reality

Suspending Reality

Burning Man collaborative art comes to Wan-Der-Lust The six artists behind “Wan-Der-Lust,” a month-long (now through May 15) mixed-media pop-up exhibit on the ground floor of 72 Wooster Street, announces its mission in a black painted scrawl over the entrance: “Wanderlust is about the primal impulse for exploration. The work assembled expresses a freedom pulsing...
Blink First

Blink First

Luigi Ghirri’s photographs give new perspective A few of the images in Luigi Ghirri’s “Kodachrome” series (on view now at the Matthew Marks gallery) are unexpectedly religious. A wooden bench with a soft, curved back sits on a pink and white tiled floor in an old hotel. An arched brick doorway reveals a folded beach...
Eye on Auctions

Eye on Auctions

Asian Week Wonders New York auction houses present an astounding variety of top-quality items from India, Tibet, Japan and China during mid-March “Asia Week.” From archaic bronze vessels to modern Indian paintings, there is much to see in the preview exhibitions that begin March 15. Check the websites for details, blogs and videos, related events,...
Worth A Thousand Words

Worth A Thousand Words

 Ed Ruscha’s book projects–explained January marked the 50th anniversary of Ed Ruscha’s influential book “Twentysix Gasoline Stations,” in which Ruscha’s Route 66 road trip yielded a collection of influential black-and-white photographs of filling (or emptying, if you will) stations, isolating the anomie of their stark, graphically interesting forms, with no text explanation. Ruscha’s Steinbeckian journey...
The Accidental Buddhists

The Accidental Buddhists

Artists’ Sacred Visions at Tibet House The gallery at Tibet House is hosting “Sacred Vision, Separate Views: Contemporary Buddhist Perspectives In Art,” an exhibition of works by six artists whose study and practice of Buddhism have informed their work in distinctly different ways not readily identifiable as “Buddhist art”. Here is an exhibition that is...