Author Archive
York’s Ville

York’s Ville

Albert York captures nature’s crooked perfection  In 1995, the New Yorker art critic Calvin Tomkins asked Albert York why he painted. Stubbing out a cigarette, York replied, “I think we live in a paradise. This is a Garden of Eden, really it is. It might be the only paradise we ever know, and it’s just...
Making ‘Little’ Magazines Big

Making ‘Little’ Magazines Big

The Grolier Club presents the history of intellect Talk of turn-of-the-century little magazines usually revolves around Modernist publications such as Wyndham Lewis’s Blast, T. S. Eliot’s Criterion, and The Little Review (motto: “Making no compromise with the public taste”), in which Ulysses was serialized. The Grolier Club’s latest exhibition, “American Little Magazines of the 1890s:...
Lose Yourself in a Maze

Lose Yourself in a Maze

St. Augustine once wrote, “Solvitur ambulando” (“It is solved by walking”). The Marble Collegiate Church is now offering the public a chance to test this principle by walking its newly installed labyrinth. The terrazzo-marble pathway is 30 feet in diameter and modeled on that of the glorious medieval cathedral in Chartres, France. One of the...
Ivy Style at FIT

Ivy Style at FIT

The organizers of “Ivy Style” acknowledge that this clothing can seem “conservative, even static,” but they provide a detailed history of its evolution. A wall bears an amusing quotation from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise: “I want to go where people aren’t barred because of the color of their necktie.” Ivy style was...
"Circus and the City: New York, 1793-2010"

“Circus and the City: New York, 1793-2010″

Visitors to the Bard Graduate Center’s “Circus and the City: New York, 1793-2010” are greeted by a wooden drum from 1835 upon which is painted the great seal of the United States. The instrument is a handsome symbol of the circus’s pedigree, which the curator Matthew Wittmann has fleshed out in great detail, with over...
Woolf at the Door

Woolf at the Door

Literary Arts from The Waves to the Lighthouse to East Hampton As an undergraduate at Harvard in the sixties, William B. Beekman asked a tutor if he might read Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. The skeptical reply: “She’s out of fashion.” Woolf’s novels had not yet received the sustained critical attention that would be sparked...