Author Archive
Singing For Freedom

Singing For Freedom

Local Anti-Slavery concert rings out the news One of the most persistent delusions of human existence is the belief that one person has the right to enslave another.  Few people attempt to justify the practice publically, yet it thrives in its various forms virtually everywhere. According to Free the Slaves, a non-governmental organization/ lobby group...
Slippery Keyboard King

Slippery Keyboard King

Terry Waldo swings the blues for locals at JALC   Midway through the second session of keyboardist/writer/producer/author Terry Waldo’s four-part course on early 20th century ragtime pianist James P. Johnson (Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 at Jazz at Lincoln Center), he scans the room from his perch at the piano. “Is there anybody here who wants to play the...
Making Art Socialable

Making Art Socialable

ArtistEngage connects artists to the world   Here’s an evergreen question: how does an emerging artist get his or her work out there? These days, the answer seems to lie in navigating an ever-proliferating, often-overwhelming array of apps and social media possibilities. Somewhere between figuring it out on your own and overly formal “how to” conference...
Rediscovering Carnival

Rediscovering Carnival

Fête Paradiso comes to New York  Touring the acre or so of Governor’s Island dedicated to Fête Paradiso is like traveling back in time to a simpler past, to the sunlit French countryside on a summer’s Sunday in the early 19th century, where villagers have gathered to eat, drink, and enjoy handcrafted carnival rides and...
Suspending Reality

Suspending Reality

Burning Man collaborative art comes to Wan-Der-Lust The six artists behind “Wan-Der-Lust,” a month-long (now through May 15) mixed-media pop-up exhibit on the ground floor of 72 Wooster Street, announces its mission in a black painted scrawl over the entrance: “Wanderlust is about the primal impulse for exploration. The work assembled expresses a freedom pulsing...
Sojourner Snoop

Sojourner Snoop

A hip-hop icon’s chronicle of reincarnated rap culture Rapper Snoop Dogg’s not the first African-American musician to be smitten by reggae culture. For the most part, though, Black American traditions, both religious and musical, are too entrenched and compelling themselves to cede to Haile Selassie worship over the one drop riddim. Still, old school Rasta-reggae’s...
The CityArts Interview

The CityArts Interview

Harold Holzer on the 16th Potus Harold Holzer calls himself an “opportunist,” but this is true only in the most positive sense—he embraces all promising opportunities that cross his path. “If a project comes along that sounds exciting, it doesn’t matter how impossible it is,” he says. “I try to dive into it.” The opportunities...
Survival of the Arts

Survival of the Arts

Ellie Covan’s Dixon Place is Home for Culture Just before a recent performance of Dan Fishback’s musical The Material World (held-over, full house, many turned away), Dixon Place’s omnipotently attractive founder/creative director Ellie Covan took the stage to thank “those of you in the audience who are holding drinks” and then warmly encouraged everyone else...
From Roots to Toots

From Roots to Toots

BAM’s ‘Do the Reggae’ series explores music on screen Jamaican music came into its own in the early ’60s, thanks to the advent of cheap transistor radios and the country’s 1962 release from British rule. The island’s 2.7 million descendants of African captives could now tune in more easily to Miami, New Orleans and post-Castro...
Park Life

Park Life

Jonathan Kuhn on keeping art alive The day after the Twin Towers fell, Jonathan Kuhn and his two young sons headed for the woodland solace of Central Park’s North End Ravine, where a lone man was catching crayfish in the stream. Nearly 12 years later, the director of arts & antiquities for NYC’s Parks Department...
Park Perks

Park Perks

James Burke wants art for all of the people all of the time The pockets of lustrous green that are our parks these days put the lie to the notion of summer drudgery in the city, especially when we can visit Central Park or stroll to a neighborhood patch where the City Parks Foundation (CPF)...
BAM Takes Shape

BAM Takes Shape

Melillo enables artists and audiences Responsive and initiating in just the right proportions, the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), at 38 Lafayette Ave. in Fort Greene, seems inextricably linked to its home borough, with BAM’s offerings—all the performing arts, cinema, a café, even hosting Memorial Day weekend’s sprawling outdoor African bazaar—radiating and refining the scrappy...
Monologues and Madness

Monologues and Madness

Tulis McCall’s no-pressure cabaret In the midst of the overpriced, dull landscape that has become Greenwich Village stands the Cornelia Street Café, a survivor from an earlier era when audiences discovered young Bob Dylans and Maya Angelous. Monologues and Madness, a monthly event in the Café’s basement, restores that now-rare glow of discovery. Founded and...
Expanding Yard

Expanding Yard

Miss Lilly Brings A Jamaican Cultural Hub to New York The clusters of tiny enterprises—let’s say a ramshackle recording studio nestled behind a patty shop and sided by an ice cream vendor—that dot Kingston, Jamaica’s downtown urbanscape are known as “yards,” one-stop destinations catering to the island’s basic needs for food and music and testifying...